Fat Camps Do Not Offer Essential Fitness Education

It is important to stay hydrated especially during the hotter months.  Our bodies are made up of 60-70% water, so we need to constantly replenish our water supply.  Fat camps do not teach the importance of hydration and why we need to keep drinking water.

We are always looking for that high sugar and calorie filled soda, juice or sports drink  .The easiest and quickest way to determine your hydration is to look at your urine.  If it’s a light yellow then your body is properly hydrated, but if it’s a dark yellow then you are most likely dehydrated, so drink more water.  If you catch yourself constantly running to the bathroom and your urine is clear, then you are probably drinking too much water, or you may need to excrete that water through sweat.

Fat camps may encourage campers to keep drinking water because of their workouts, but they aren’t necessarily teaching its importance.  Learning about these essentials if very important because it helps our bodies’ function properly.  Fat camps do not provide support guidance to their campers as they losing weight and how to continue losing weight when they leave camp.

Did You Know These Effects Of Obesity?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention more than 36% of Americans are now considered obese and an additional 34% are considered to be overweight.  People are no longer surprised by these statics mentioned in 7 Surprising Effects of Obesity, but it can be surprising to find out how being obese can actually effect every area of your life such as health, family and income.

Obese people have a greater risk for all cancers and they are often diagnosed in later stages than thinner people and have higher chances of dying from the disease.  The National Cancer Institute connects 34,000 new cases of cancer in men and 50,000 in women each year with obesity. There are some theories as to why heavy weight connects with higher rates of cancer.  Raul Seballos, vice chairman of preventive medicine at the Cleveland Clinic states, “It could be that excess fat cells increase hormonal activity or they increase growth factors that lead to tumor growth.”  Looking at weight loss data it suggests that some of this risk can end by losing excess weight.

Infertility increases with overweight women.  Dr. Marc Bessler, stated that obesity is an inflammatory state and that alone might decrease fertility and that it may also be the result of hormone changes produced because of fatty tissue.   Many infertility clinics will not accept patients with high body mass indexes because of their low chances of becoming pregnant.  However, after some of his patients lost weight they were able to become pregnant.  Overweight women who are able to get pregnant have a higher risk of having a preterm baby. The researchers theorize that having too much fat may inflame and weaken the uterine and cervical membranes.

Poor sleep has an impact to many diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and obesity.  Many studies have shown that lack of sleep tend to expand waistlines, for example, a study showed that people who slept less than 5 hours a night were 15% more likely to gain weight than people who slept for 7 hours.  For obese people sleep apnea is one of the most immediate health dangers, which is a condition when a person gasps or stops breathing for a moment when they are sleeping.

A Yale study showed that heavy weight is the number one reason why people are bullied at any age and the people who are bullied have lower self-esteem, higher depression levels and an increased risk of suicide.  Rebecca Puhl, the study’s lead author stated, “More than 40% of children who see treatment for weight loss say they have been bullied or teased by a family member.”  In Puhl studies, it showed that 67% of overweight men and women report being shamed and bullied in a doctor’s office.  50% of doctors found their overweight patients were “awkward, ugly weak-willed and unlikely to comply with treatment” while 24% of the nurses said they were repulsed by the patients.  Negative remarks from a healthcare provider is definitely destructive to obese people, they already have a greater number of health problems than average there is no need to add negative remarks.

Studies have also shown the bigger your waistband, the smaller your wallet.  A study showed that women who weighed 25 pounds less than the group average made $15,572 a year more than women of normal weight and those who were 25 pounds above average earned an average of $13,847 less than an average weight female.  There was not a difference found among men.

Only Half of Americas Kids get Physical Activity

As of June 25, 2013 according to a federal government study only half of American youth get the suggested amount of physical activity and less than a third eat the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables each day.

Nearly 10,000 students aged 11 to 16 in 39 states were surveyed.  Researchers found that only half exercised for five or more days a week and fewer than one in every three ate fruits and vegetables daily.

Study author Ronald Iannotti, of the prevention research branch of the U.S. National Institute of the Child Health and Human Development, stated in an institute news release, “The students showed a surprising variability in eating patterns.”  He also mentioned that about 74% of the students did not have a healthy pattern.  The students were asked to describe their body image, emotional health, and satisfaction with life.  The students diet and exercise habits were classified into three general categories: unhealthful (26%), healthful (27%), and typical (47%).

The typical groups were less likely to exercise for five or more days a week or eat fruits and vegetable at least once a day.  This group was most likely to spend time watching television, play video games or on the computer than the students in the healthful group, but less likely to do so than the students in the unhealthful group.  The typical group infrequently ate fruit and vegetables, but they also infrequently consumed junk food like chips, French fries, sweets, or soda.  There were more likely to be overweight or obese and unhappy about their appearance of their bodies than the other two groups.

The unhealthful group had consumed the most junk food and was also more likely to watch TV, play video games, and use a computer for more than two hours a day than the other two groups.  Although all the unhealthy food they consumed, this group was more likely to be underweight and actually needed to put on some weight.  This group was also more likely to report symptoms of depression and poor physical health, like backaches, stomachaches, headaches, or feeling dizzy.

In the healthful group about 65% of the students exercised for five or more days a week, which was the highest rate of the three groups.  This group was less likely to sit in front of a screen and consume junk food.  They were most likely to report that they were eating fruits and vegetables daily.  They also had the lowest rates of depression, but had the highest life satisfaction ratings.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans suggests that children and teens should get one hour or more of moderate or vigorous aerobic physical activity a day, which includes  intense exercise at least three days a week.

This is in reference to Three in Four U.S. Kids Missing Out on Healthy Lifestyle.

Less Sleep for Teens could take away from Healthy Eating

BlogPic4Whether your teen gets enough sleep or not could determine the kinds of food they tend to eat.

Research that was presented at the annual SLEEP 2013 conference show that teens who are sleep deprived tend to eat less healthfully than teens who are well rested.  Sleep deprived teens not only just eat more food that is bad for them, but they tend to eat less healthy food.  “While we already know that sleep duration is associated with a range of health consequences, this study speaks to some of the mechanisms, i.e., nutrition and decision making, through which health outcomes are affected,” stated a study researcher Lauren Hale, Ph.D., an associate professor of preventive medicine at Stony Brook University School of Medicine.

In the study, researchers examined data from 13,284 teens with an average of 16 who were a part of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.  18% of the teens had slept less than seven hours a night.  These sleepy teens were less likely to eat healthy foods like fruits and vegetables throughout the week and were more likely to eat unhealthy fast food at least two times a week, compared to the teens who got more sleep the night before.

According to the National Sleep Foundation, most teenagers need around 9.5 hours of a sleep, while some need about 8.5 hours, but only 15% of teens get 8.5  hours of sleep on school nights.

A recent study in the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology showed that sleep deprivation could make people want larger food portions.   The researcher of this study, Pleunie hogenkamp of Uppsala University suggested that, “sleep deprivation enhances food intake regardless of satiety.”

Last month a study that was shown at the annual meeting of The Endocrine Society showed that sleep loss is linked with high blood level of a molecule, which regulate the feelings of reward that comes from eating.  This could be a reason why people seem to crave food after a bad nights sleep.

In reference to Sleep-Deprived teens skimp on produce, eat more unhealthy food:study

Fitness Camp – The Power of Example in Child/Teen Weight Loss

When your kids were small, your mother might have cautioned you against saying something in front of them with the time-worn phrase, “Little pitchers have big ears” meaning children hear and understand more than you think.

Well, those little pitchers have big eyes too and they don’t stop watching you just because they are now older (even when they are teens). Your every move is watched and even emulated. When it comes to weight loss and healthy eating habits, you can provide a good example (or a bad one.) This is particularly important for when your kid returns home from weight loss camp. You don’t want to undo all the good results they have achieved, so now is the time to look to your own diet and exercise habits.

Consider starting the day with some stretches –a habit that will be useful well into the years when you are a grandparents. If you do these on your living room floor, your kids will notice as they bound by. Invite them to join in.

Next comes breakfast, the most important meal for a reason, it is the fuel for the day. Ask your kids to research which juices and fruits are best for your family and have them report the results to you–then buy (or better still-squeeze the juices). Let them experiment with juice combinations too. Make sure there are several healthy cereals available for those rushed mornings, as well as yogurt, fresh fruit, and a handy blender for a dash-for-the-door smoothie. Don’t you dare limit yourself to a cup of coffee because you are late for work!

Pack your healthy lunch for work and let our kid pack their own lunches from the ingredients you’ve assembled. Make sure you have nuts and fruit and whole grains in transportable pieces for ease of use. Banish soda and soft drinks from your house. Buy a water filter pitcher and keep plenty of organic juices around. Start monitoring your own fluid intake–making sure you get plenty of liquid to flush your kidneys. Trade in whole mile for low-fat milk in your refrigerator. Investigate drinking soy milk or almond milk instead–as your kids for their opinions of each.

Keep fresh fruit, like apples or dried fruit in the winter, for a quick handful of energy. Replace them (uncomplainingly) when your kids eat them all. Substitute sources of protein (other than meat) when possible–find out what type of beans (kidney, navy, garbanzo) and tofu your kids like and start eating them yourself.

Buy a rice cooker and brown rice. Keep it and salt-free soy sauce handy. A bowl of low-fat milk, honey, and rice even make a great sweet substitute.

Invite your kids out for an after-dinner walk (and, if you are lucky, talk. Tell them you enjoy their company and love talking things over with them.) Enjoy a light dessert, like natural sorbet or frozen yogurt, when you return and throw out the cookies and cakes (if you find yourself jumping in the car and driving to the store for a fattening dessert at night, you might need to visit an adult weight loss camp.)

Join a gym with a family membership. Set a schedule when you will go and stick to it. Let your kids know the schedule will be kept and that they are always invited and will provide the ride. Buy a bike and use it. Train for a marathon–in front of the whole family. Get them rooting for you. Then follow through on that and all your healthy changes. When they see your commitment, they will know you are serious and it can start the gears in their brains a-turning.

Parenting doesn’t have to be all, “Do it because I said so”! It can be “Do what I do,” if you utilize the power of example.

Teen Obesity

Changing the Face of How We Eat

When America was an agricultural society, huge meals were served midday (this meal was called “dinner” in the Farm Belt). Everyone came in from the fields and were served mountains of potatoes and bread, creamed vegetables, butter-fried meats and rich desserts like pie ala mode (pie bake-offs were a staple at country fairs.) If children were still in school (many were given time off to work the fields), they lugged these calorie-laden foods to school in their lunch pails. The kitchen was the “heart of the home” and the word “dieting” was never uttered. Yet not half as many people were obese as are today. What has changed?

Plowing, seeding, weeding, haying, and taking care of animals required hard physical work. Even school kids hauled buckets and mucked stables and sowed feed when they got home from school and, at school, recess meant energetic games of Red Rover and Kickball. Girls jumped rope for hours and boys wrestled each other constantly.

These days, however, kids spend most of their post-homework time on the computer or playing video games. Teens spend time on MySpace instead of expending their energies outside. Since few of us grow our own, food seems to appear magically on store shelves with no more effort required of us than to drive to the supermarket to get it.

So the new reality is we must educate ourselves about nutrition and plan for exercise must be arranged and followed–but how to get an overweight child or teen to start and stick to such a program?

The answer is weight loss camp. For a short investment of time –just several weeks in a summer otherwise filled with more video games and boredom –your child or teen can take the first steps to a healthier life and learn to change how they eat. By changing what they take into their body and how they move that body every day, your child will begin taking control of their life.

At camp, outdoor activities are encouraged and everyone gets to participate–not just a select few. Team sports become fun with the encouragement and support of fellow campers and the trained staff, and new sports can be tried without risk of embarrassment that comes with joining in an activity where everyone is fit and your child is not yet so. Even singular activities like swimming, hiking or dancing become more inviting when a kid knows they will not only feel a sense of accomplishment, but will get some applause from other campers for having achieved the goal.

Weight loss camp also teaches the obese child or teen how to make good choices in foods to eat. They are taught about nutrition and calorie intake, how to read a label in a supermarket, how to cook healthy food, how “real” food –as opposed to the empty calories and chemical additives of processed food–tastes and how such choices affect their health. No one ever goes hungry at weight-loss camp, but the proper food choices paired with the increase in physical activity will result in a before and after weight loss your child or teen will see and feel. Their energy will be increased, they will sleep better and their attitude will change. Self-image will improve and exercise–once a dirty word–will come to mean “fun”. The healthy habits they learn (and the friends they meet) will build a foundation for a lifetime of good health.

Teen Weight Loss

Teen Weight Loss Camps: A Judgement-Free Environment

As adults, there are times where we’d like to stand out, to grab extra attention and be noticed for being unique…and therein lies the difference between us and teenagers.

From adolescence right up until well into college, teenagers often just want to fit it, to belong to a group, to find safety and acceptance in numbers. Stepping out alone can be terrifying, which is why the idea of being shipped off to a “fat camp” is not something most kids are looking forward to–even when they need to lose weight and just such a place may turn the tide of their weight gain. They don’t yet realize that a weight loss camp, specifically for kids, is full of other teens going through the same challenges and who are therefore able to offer each other special support.

Here’s what we’ve learned after more than four decades of creating weight loss camps for teens: An obese teen is an unhappy teen and cliques of kids at school or on sports teams are often the cruelest to that kid who already feels like he or she isn’t worth much. Name-calling, shunning, mocking get to be second nature to the kid who is different in any way and obesity makes kids different from most of their peers. The weight gain often comes as just the time that teens are particularly body conscious (and perpetually exposed to images of anorexic models and steroid-enhanced athletes) and, combined with hormonal changes, an overweight kid is in for a rough ride.

Even well-meaning parents can add to the pain. Criticism, spoken or just perceived, can make teenagers feel even more down on themselves, which may lead to emotional overeating, which means more weight gain and less self-esteem–and the cycle continues. A good weight loss camp, with a proven history of providing a safe and judgment- free haven for kids to work on their weight problems, is one way to break the cycle.

At Camp Shane, counselors are trained to immediately nip any bullying or cruelty in the bud, encourage campers to concentrate on helping one another face (and conquer) their weight issues, and provide a safe place to learn new habits and make new friends. At such a camp, teens can open up and talk to each other without fear of judgement and a problem shared truly is a problem halved.

Together with the staff and “a little help from their friends” overweight teens can start down the road to a healthier and happier life and weather the inevitable storms of adolescence.

Summer Weight Loss Camps

Summertime Experiences at Weight Loss Camp for Teens

As soon as the Spring months come around. every teenager starts counting the days till summer vacation and “no more teachers, no more books”, but the summer months are still times of learning and new experiences–some of them life-changing.

Kids head in a multitude of different directions during the summer months. Some kids head off to jobs to dip their toes in the wage-earning world they will enter soon enough. Others travel abroad or here in the US, trying new things like rock-climbing, white-water rafting, or just mastering the skills needed for their first time alone on an airplane. Others volunteer, helping others, learning skills that will help them and our society. All are gaining confidence that will stand them in good stead in their futures.

Another direction some kids go into, particularly overweight teens- is retreating to the couch, bowl of popcorn in lap, to play endless video games as their weight balloons and their self-esteem plunges. As parents, you may be at your wit’s end about what to do and how to motivate and get your teen off the couch and out in the world.

As teen weight loss experts and owners of the longest-running weight loss camp for kids, we’d like to offer a suggestion: Consider the extra time your teen is home in the summer as an opportunity to spend some real time together…nonjudgmental time–time to allow your teen to open up to you about how they really feel about their obesity and how they feel in their own skin.

There really is no need to point out that your kid is overweight. They know they are and they find it shameful, but most don’t know how to stop the endless cycle of overeating and then feeling terrible about themselves.

When they are home, provide every opportunity for them to move their bodies in helpful (and fun ways), this will not only strengthen your relationship with your teen, but will get you moving too! Challenge them to a tennis tournament or teach them to play handball, and making sure your house is stocked with plenty of fresh, wholesome (and nutritionally sound foods)–suggest that they might like to spend a few weeks helping themselves face their weight problems at a weight loss camp especially for teens.

At weight loss camp, explain that there they will be surrounded by kids just like themselves–no need to feel badly there about putting on a swimsuit–and there they can take charge of their own life (as they soon will do in “the real world”). Suggest that you are willing to treat them like the adults they soon will be and that you will arrange for them to have this opportunity at a weight loss camp for teens-if they will take the opportunity to do something for themselves.

Emphasize that this experience will not be a “boot camp” or “fat camp” but a place to have fun, play sports, learn about healthy food, and grab control of this problem that is plaguing them. Away from the eyes of their friends, it will be easier. Paint a picture of how great it will be when they show up for the first day of school in the fall with a whole new look, and a whole new outlook on life. Their energy will be up, they will be happier in social settings and be confident at making better food choices when they are out with their friends. The things that your kid will learn at just such a teen weight loss camp will stay with them long past their graduation day.

Fitness Exercises to Lose Weight

Helping Overweight Teens Gain Control of Their Lives

Adolescence is a scary time (think back to the endless waiting for the invitation to the big dance or what to do if your friend is driving drunk or to hoping your college of choice will accept you). Every day teens are faced with situations they never faced before and lots of choices to be made with no guarantee their decision is the right one.

Double the terror for the teen who is overweight. When it comes to teen weight loss, they think the deck is stacked against them. They are the kid not asked for the date, the one either made fun of or reduced to always being the jolly fat kid –the class clown, rather than the star athlete–always the best friend, never the girl or boyfriend. They hear the whispering in the hall when they pass and they face trying on new clothes for school with a dread a skinny kid can’t imagine. Trying out for sports is an exercise in humiliation and watching everyone else get ready for the prom is a lesson in shame.

Weight loss camp can put an end to these miseries for the overweight teen and teach them a truly vital lesson in living that can be applied to every situation in their future: You can take control and change your life. Nothing is et in stone and your life can be happy and fulfilled, not ruled by hiding, shame or embarrassment about the body you inhabit. That body can be changed and that successful, confident, and happy person inside can come shining through.

At weight loss camp, everyone is treated with respect and support. The entire staff is trained to help a teen overcome the obstacles in their way–starting with shyness (isolation is one of the coping techniques of an overweight teen), low self-esteem (teens are taught to accept where they are as a starting point and build from there) and avoidance of risk (at camp, everyone is encouraged to try and everyone makes the team, shares the glory, and is recognized for their own special talents and abilities.)

Positive reinforcement is the order of the day and bullies and trash-talkers are immediately taught that type of negative behavior doesn’t fly at weight loss camp (Counselors do understand that some teens put others down to build themselves up. They then help the kids learn a new way to build their self-esteem).

Kids are given the tools to change the way they eat: nutrition information, cooking classes, instruction in how to make healthy choices–and once given the tools, make better decisions.

No one is treated like a child at camp, All the teen contribute their creative ideas and suggestions to the group and all are praised for their contributions. Teens flourish under such encouragement and their outlook about themselves and their bodies starts to change. They leave camp with more information, a better outlook, and much more confidence. Such increased self-esteem helps them face all their trials in life-not just those connected to weight. Just one summer can change their entire lives for the better.

Obesity’s Emotional Effect

mealTeenagers should never be comfortable being overweight. Any excuses given are generally to deflect attention away from the weight, playing the “blame game” especially if they can claim it’s due to genetics. However, most teenagers don’t really believe this excuse. Our weight loss camps are designed to tackle issues. Teens often feel at ease when they are not the “only” child who is overweight. This knowledge helps ease their fears and self-conscious feelings that many have when they interacting with their slimmer counterparts. When they’re with other overweight or obese teenagers who have put forth all the same excuses, it’s easier to be honest and finally face their insecurities.

The time teenagers spend at a weight loss camp allows them to open up about their feelings – after all, every camper who attends is facing similar challenges. The campers can help one another deal with the problems and excuses that trouble them. There’s no reason to be concerned about how they look in front of others. They are encouraged to be themselves, and the result is that it’s their personalities that shine through.

Most teenagers understand how obesity adversely affects their health. What they don’t really comprehend are the emotional effects. When they can openly talk about their problems in a sympathetic setting, they are taking the first step in confronting their weight and setting up a weight loss and fitness plan they can follow throughout their life.

The focus of our weight loss camps is to offer a program that educates teens on the benefits of a healthy diet combined with a regular exercise regimen. Just as importantly, we teach teens to be truthful and sincere about how they are feeling, as it helps them realize why they are overweight or obese.

FOR OVERWEIGHT CHILDREN & TEENS, WEIGHT LOSS CAMPS & WEIGHT LOSS PROGRAMS OFFER GREAT BENEFIT. WEIGHT LOSS CAMP FEATURES NUTRITION EDUCATION, WEIGHT LOSS TIPS, DIETING INFORMATION, FITNESS PROGRAMS, EXERCISE, WEIGHT LOSS, SELF-ESTEEM BUILDING, EXCITING ACTIVITIES, GREAT FUN AND FRIENDSHIPS.